Water






Building a Water Supply Procedure

Introduction

An effective water supply procedure ensures that water, ice and steam are supplied at adequate volume, pressure, and temperature for all processing, sanitation and personal hygiene activities.

Use these checklists - in conjunction with the sample Water Supply Procedure documents provided at the end of this section - to help you in building an effective water supply procedure for your facility.

Your Water Supply Procedure should include:

  • All water, ice, and steam uses, e.g.:
    • chemical mixing and application
    • hand washing
    • processing, e.g. processing aids for rinsing and chilling
    • equipment rinsing and other sanitation activities
    • ingredients

Note: Refer to your Water Uses worksheet when you consider your water supply.

  • Water temperatures required for all activities in your facility
  • Daily volume of water required for all activities in your facility
  • Water pressure required for all activities in your facility
  • Instructions for monitoring water temperature, volume and pressure, including:
    • who performs the monitoring
    • when/how often they perform the monitoring
    • what they are monitoring
    • how and where they perform the monitoring
    • corrective action procedures (i.e. instructions to follow if deviations occur)

Your Water Supply Records should include:

  • Who performed the monitoring
  • What locations were monitored
  • When monitoring was performed
  • Monitoring results
  • Any deviations
  • Corrective actions taken if deviations were found
  • Signed or initialed records when complete

Useful Resources


Building a Water Testing Procedure

Introduction

Follow this checklist in conjunction with the sample Water Testing Procedure document provided at the end of this section to help you in building an effective water testing procedure. An effective procedure ensures water used for processing, sanitation, and personnel hygiene activities in your facility is potable (i.e. safe to drink).

Your Water Testing Procedure should include:

Water testing for E. Coli and total coliforms

Note: Acceptable levels for both E. Coli and total coliforms are non-detectable.

  • Testing for chemicals (e.g. heavy metals, pesticides) if your facility is located in areas with known high chemical levels
  • Specific water (including re-circulated water) and ice sampling procedures to avoid contaminating samples - including:
    • who performs the sampling
    • when/how often they perform the sampling
    • what they are sampling
    • how and where they perform the sampling
    • schematic showing where water samples are collected
    • corrective action procedures (i.e. instructions to follow if deviations occur/if test results indicate the presence of E. Coli or total coliforms)
  • Instructions to ensure steam and ice used in the facility are potable if they might contact food, ingredients, processing aids, packaging materials or food contact surfaces

Note: Your facility should have a plan to be followed when there is a boil water event or water safety alert to ensure water for all processes is potable.

Your Water Testing Records should include:

  • Who performed the sampling
  • What locations were sampled
  • When the sampling was performed
  • What was tested for
  • Test results (including municipal water reports)
  • Any deviations
  • Corrective actions taken if deviations were found
  • Signed or initialed records when completed

Useful Resources


Building a Water Treatment Procedure

Introduction

Follow this checklist in conjunction with the sample Water Treatment Procedure document to help you in building an effective water treatment procedure. An effective procedure ensures that any treated water used for processing, sanitation, and personnel hygiene is potable.

Your Chemical Water Treatment Procedure should include:

  • A list of required chemicals*
  • A list of mixing instructions for the required chemicals
  • Instructions for use of the required chemicals, including:
    • who performs the water treatment activities
    • when/how often they perform the activities
    • what activities they are performing
    • how and where they perform the activities
    • deviation procedures (i.e. instructions to follow if deviations occur)
  • Instructions on how to test water to ensure residual level of chemical used is in the correct range
  • A water treatment frequency that is adequate for the water usage/flow in the facility
  • The Material Safety Data Sheet (MSDS) of the chemicals used for treatment

* Important Note: All chemicals used for water treatment should be listed on the CFIA's Reference Listing of Accepted Construction Materials, Packing Materials and Non-Food Chemicals Products or have a letter of no objection from Health Canada.

Your Physical Water Treatment Procedure should include:

  • Instructions for monitoring the treatment system according to the manufacturer's instructions. including:
    • who performs the monitoring
    • when/how often they perform the monitoring
    • what they are monitoring
    • how and where they perform the monitoring
    • corrective action procedures (i.e. instructions to follow if deviations occur)
  • Replacement of the physical water treatment devices (e.g. filters, contactors, UV light source membranes, boilers) on a set schedule as outlined in your Preventative Maintenance and Calibration program

*Important Note: If you use re-circulated water, ensure your treatment procedure considers the prior use of the water and its intended use.

Your Water Treatment Records should include:

  • Who performed the treatment
  • What treatment was performed
  • When the treatment was performed
  • Treatment test results
  • Any deviations
  • Corrective actions taken if deviations were found
  • Signed or initialed records when completed

Note: If using an external company to monitor water treatment equipment, ensure that service reports are:

  • complete, clear and legible
  • signed and dated by a designated facility employee.

Useful Resources


Building a Water Training Procedure

Introduction

An effective water training procedure ensures personnel understand the appropriate procedures related to water treatment testing, and supply in your facility. To help you build training procedures for your facility, use this checklist in conjunction with the sample water training procedure documents provided at the end of this section.

Your Water Training Procedure should include:

  • Personnel who require training
  • Frequency of training (e.g. upon hiring, when change or incident occurs, minimum annually)
  • Person responsible to deliver training and keep records
  • A process to ensure all appropriate personnel are present for training
  • A list of training materials such as:
    • copies of Water Treatment, Testing, and Supply Procedures and associated records
    • GMP Training Kit - Module 7: Water Safety
    • drinking water publications from the Ministry of Environment - Drinking Water Ontario website
    • material provided by your water treatment chemical supplier
    • manufacturer manual for the devices used for water treatment
    • MSDS of the chemicals used for water treatment
    • videos/ visual aids
  • A method to assess that training was understood by participants (e.g. a written or verbal test and/or job shadowing)
  • Corrective actions to take if training assessment results are not acceptable

Your Water Training Records should include:

  • Who was in attendance with space for employees to initial or sign to indicate they received the training
  • Date of training
  • Topic of training
  • Material used in training
  • Name and signature of the trainer conducting the training
  • Results of training assessments

Useful Resources


Building a Water Verification Procedure

Introduction

An effective water verification procedure ensures personnel are following the appropriate procedures related to water treatment, testing, and supply. Follow this checklist in conjunction with the sample water verification procedure document provided at the end of this section, to help you in building an effective water verification procedure for your facility.

Your Water Verification Procedure should include:

  • Who performs the verification
  • When/how often they perform the verification
  • What is to be verified
  • How they perform the verification (e.g. observation or interviews with personnel)
  • Corrective action procedures to be taken if verification results show that activities are not being conducted as written, or if any deviation is found
  • A process for verifying correctness and completeness of records, including:
    • mistakes have been crossed through with a single line and initialled by the designated employee, and liquid paper has not been used
    • documents have been completed in permanent ink (no pencil)
    • all records are signed and dated by the designated employee
    • no blank spaces have been left on the record - if necessary "N/A" was recorded
    • the activities have been carried out in the appropriate frequency
    • there is no evidence of falsified entries
    • all deviations and corrective actions are documented and are suitable
    • if a deviation was recurring, a root cause analysis was conducted

Your Water Verification Records should include:

  • Who performed the verification
  • What verification was performed (i.e. which procedure is being verified)
  • When the verification was performed
  • Verification results/findings
  • Any deviations
  • Corrective actions taken if deviations were found
  • Signed or initialed records when completed.

Note: Verification records can be separate from monitoring records, or space can be allocated on the monitoring records to record the verification results.

Useful Resources


For more information:
Toll Free: 1-877-424-1300
E-mail: FoodSafety@ontario.ca


Author: OMAFRA Staff
Creation Date: 9 December 2013
Last Reviewed: 08 June 2018