Preventative Maintenance and Calibration




Preventative Maintenance and Calibration Checklist

Introduction

An effective preventative maintenance and calibration program ensures that equipment that could impact food safety works the way it should and does not present food safety hazards. A preventative maintenance program can also save time and money by reducing unscheduled downtime and unexpected major repairs.

Use these checklists - in conjunction with the sample preventative maintenance and calibration procedures provided at the end of this section - to help you in developing effective preventative maintenance and calibration procedures for your facility.

Your Preventative Maintenance Procedures should include:

  • A list of all the equipment that may impact food safety including:
    • any food contact equipment (e.g. conveyors, agitators, grinders, tanks, injectors, tenderizers, saws)
    • equipment designed to cook or otherwise reduce or eliminate bacterial load (e.g. smokehouses, ovens, pasteurizers and kettles)
    • equipment designed to control processing conditions such as pressure, temperature, time, pH, water activity (e.g. thermometers, timers, gauges, pH meters, water activity meters)
    • equipment designed to weigh or add ingredients, processing aids or preservatives (e.g. scales, chlorine feeders and ingredient dispensers)
    • equipment designed to detect or remove metal, bones, stones, glass, wood and other foreign material (e.g. metal detectors, X-ray, magnets, screens, air filters, optical sorters)
    • equipment designed to store food at a controlled temperature (e.g. freezers, coolers, water-baths)
    • equipment designed to control cross-contamination (e.g. boot washers, foamers)
  • Preventative maintenance procedures for all equipment on your list, including instructions for:
    • equipment disassembly
    • adjustment and/or replacement of parts that are deteriorated or damaged
    • selecting the appropriate and approved chemical depending on the equipment (e.g. grease, lubricants, refrigerants)
    • lubrication and cleaning of parts
    • inspecting the equipment to ensure the parts are working as intended
    • equipment re-assembly
    • testing the equipment to ensure it is working as intended
    • preventing cross-contamination during maintenance
    • ensuring the area and equipment are clean after maintenance and all tools and parts are accounted for
  • A schedule of when preventative maintenance procedures are performed for all equipment on your list

Your Calibration Procedures should include:

  • A list of all devices that require calibration:
    • consider creating equipment ID numbers to help identify equipment
  • Instructions for:
    • initial setup in calibration mode
    • checking the current operation of the equipment/device
    • actions to be taken if the equipment/device is out of specification
    • adjustment if the equipment/device does not fall within the required specifications/limits
    • ensuring the device operates within its specifications after the adjustment
    • ensuring the area and equipment are clean after calibration and all tools and parts are accounted for
  • Instructions for performing calibrations using reference equipment (e.g. certified thermometer)
  • A schedule of when calibration procedures are performed for all devices on your list

Note: If external contractors are used for preventative maintenance or calibration, their qualifications should be evaluated (e.g. reference checks). Their service reports can be used as the preventative maintenance and/or calibration records. The service reports should be reviewed, signed and dated by a designated facility employee.

Your Preventative Maintenance and Calibration Records should include:

  • Who performed the preventative maintenance/calibration activities
  • What equipment/device was serviced
  • When the preventative maintenance/calibration was performed
  • Results/findings of the preventative maintenance/calibration activities
  • Any deviations
  • Corrective actions taken if deviations were found
  • Signed or initialed records when completed

Useful Resources


Building a Preventative Maintenance and Calibration Training Procedure

Introduction

An effective preventative maintenance and calibration training procedure ensures personnel understand the appropriate procedures to follow. To help you build training procedures for your facility, use this checklist in conjunction with the sample preventative maintenance and calibration training procedures provided at the end of this section.

Your Preventative Maintenance and Calibration Training Procedure should include:

  • Personnel who require training
  • Frequency of training (e.g. upon hiring, when change or incident occurs, minimum annually)
  • A process to ensure all appropriate personnel are present for training
  • Person responsible to deliver training and keep records
  • A list of training materials such as:
    • copies of preventative maintenance and calibration procedures
    • copies of preventative maintenance and calibration records
    • GMP Training Kit - Module 4: preventative maintenance and calibration
  • A method to assess that training was understood by participants (e.g. a written or verbal test and/or job shadowing)
  • Corrective actions to take if training assessment results are not acceptable

Your Preventative Maintenance and Calibration Training Records should include:

  • Who was in attendance - with space for employees to initial or sign to indicate they received the training
  • Date of training
  • Topic of training
  • Material used in training
  • Name and signature of the trainer conducting the training
  • Results of training assessments

Useful Resources


Building a Preventative Maintenance and Calibration Verification Procedure

Introduction

An effective preventative maintenance and calibration verification procedure ensures personnel are following the appropriate procedures in your facility. Follow this checklist - in conjunction with the sample preventative maintenance and calibration verification procedure provided at the end of this section - to help you in building an effective preventative maintenance and calibration verification procedure for your facility.

Your Preventative Maintenance and Calibration Verification Procedure should include:

  • Who performs the verification
  • When/how often they perform the verification
  • What is to be verified
  • How they perform the verification (e.g. observation or interviews with personnel)
  • Corrective action procedures to be taken if verification results show that activities are not being conducted as written, or if any deviation is found
  • A process for verifying correctness and completeness of records including:
    • mistakes have been crossed through with a single line and initialled by the designated employee, and liquid paper has not been used
    • documents have been completed in permanent ink (no pencil)
    • all records are signed and dated by the designated employee
    • no blank spaces have been left on the record - if necessary, "N/A" was recorded
    • the activities have been carried out in the appropriate frequency
    • there is no evidence of falsified entries
    • all deviations and corrective actions are documented and are suitable
    • if a deviation was recurring, a root cause analysis was conducted

Your Preventative Maintenance and Calibration Verification Records should include:

  • Who performed the verification
  • What verification was performed (i.e. which procedure is being verified)
  • When the verification was performed
  • Verification results/findings
  • Any deviations
  • Corrective actions taken if deviations were found
  • Signed or initialed records when completed

Note: Verification records can be separate from monitoring records, or space can be allocated on the monitoring records to record the verification results.

Useful Resources


For more information:
Toll Free: 1-877-424-1300
E-mail: FoodSafety@ontario.ca


Author: OMAFRA Staff
Creation Date: 18 December 2013
Last Reviewed: 08 June 2018