Facility Interior and Exterior




Facility Interior and Exterior Checklist

Introduction

The environment inside and outside your facility can impact the safety of your products. The interior of your facility, including the structure, layout, equipment, air, temperature, sewage systems, and brittle material all pose risks to the safety of your products. Exterior risks might include the harbourage of pests or dust/pollutants entering your facility. A well-designed facility interior and exterior program will ensure that your facility will protect your products from external and internal contaminants and risks.

Use these checklists - in conjunction with the sample facility interior and exterior procedures provided at the end of this section - to help you in developing facility interior and exterior programs for your facility.

Your Facility Interior and Exterior Program should include:

Interior Monitoring Procedure to ensure:

  • Floors, walls, doors, ceilings, windows and fixtures are cleanable and are constructed and maintained to prevent contamination of the facility environment, food, ingredients, processing aids and packaging materials:
    • they are constructed of materials listed on the CFIA's Reference Listing of Accepted Construction Materials, Packing Materials and Non-Food Chemicals Products
    • they are constructed of materials that are smooth, non-porous, and can withstand repeated cleaning and sanitizing
  • Wall, floor and ceiling joints are sealed and coved
  • Windows are constructed of shatterproof or meshed glass
  • Handling, preparation, processing, packaging and storage areas do not open directly outside
  • Lighting is sufficient for all activities, including processing, inspection, maintenance, cleaning and sanitizing, and does not alter the appearance of food
  • Pooling water is prevented or controlled:
    • install enough drains and sufficiently slope the floors to prevent pooling water including in washrooms
    • if water does pool, then staff are instructed to squeegee water toward the drain for removal
    • install grates in all drains - grates are easily removed for cleaning purposes
  • Water storage and distribution protects against contamination of the potable water supply
    • label/identify all lines (e.g. waste, potable and non-potable, other lines such as refrigeration)
    • ensure piping is designed and installed to prevent contamination (e.g. no dead ends, no lead solder)
    • provide hose-racks for hose storage when not in use
  • Back-flow preventers are in place, where appropriate:
    • back-flow devices should be installed at any outlets where back-siphonage could occur (e.g. ends of hoses, taps and outlets into tanks)
  • Physical or operational controls are in place to prevent cross-contamination:
    • facility design allows products to flow in a single direction from raw to finished state
    • there are designated rooms to separate incompatible food or activities
    • there are physical barriers, partitions or walls to control flow and prevent cross-contamination
    • if physical separation is not possible, operational controls are developed to prevent cross-contamination
    • boot washes and hand sanitizers are located and used to prevent cross-contamination

Personnel Facility Monitoring Procedure to ensure:

  • Washrooms, personal storage facilities and lunch rooms are equipped and maintained to prevent cross-contamination:
    • lockers should have sloped tops so nothing can be placed on top, and should not go all the way to the floor
    • food is not stored in lockers or change rooms
  • Washrooms and lunch rooms do not open directly into food processing, handling and storage areas
  • Washrooms are equipped with an adequate number of flush toilets
  • There are an adequate number of dedicated hand wash stations at processing entryways and in washrooms (e.g. enough sinks to permit all employees to properly wash their hands after break and return to the line within the required time)
  • Hand wash stations are not used for purposes other than washing hands (e.g. cleaning utensils)
  • Hand wash stations are equipped with: constant flow of warm potable water, soap from a dispenser, sanitary hand-drying equipment or supplies, a waste container, and notice instructing people to wash their hands

Equipment Monitoring Procedure to ensure:

  • Equipment and utensils that may impact food safety are constructed of materials that are non-toxic, non-corrosive, non-absorbent, smooth, do not exhibit signs of degradation, and can withstand repeated cleaning and sanitizing (e.g. no rust, lead, or exposed wood, no cracks or crevices, no evidence of degradation, no accumulation of food residue, dust, or mould)
  • Equipment design, location and installation allow for effective cleaning, sanitizing, inspection, maintenance and calibration, and prevent contamination of product:
    • all areas of equipment should be accessible with no crevices, angles or ledges that can trap food
    • open ends of tubes (e.g. legs of tables) are sealed to prevent trapping food
    • seams on equipment should be smoothly bonded with polished, even welds
    • equipment should be exhausted to the exterior to prevent condensation
    • equipment should be properly drained and/or connect directly to drains
    • equipment should have sufficient space to give access under, inside and around - for cleaning, inspection, and servicing
  • Equipment is capable of meeting the food safety requirements of the process (e.g. equipment is able to reach the correct temperature, refrigeration units must be able to maintain the correct temperature, filters must be able to filter the correct size particles):
    • equipment permits monitoring of food safety parameters such as temperature, humidity, or air flow
    • where required, monitoring devices are installed to monitor parameters required to maintain food safety (e.g. thermometers and gauges)

Temperature Control and Ventilation Monitoring Procedure to ensure:

  • Refrigeration is capable of maintaining appropriate room temperatures to prevent microbiological growth when the area is at the maximum anticipated capacity:
    • areas where food and ingredients that are not shelf stable are processed, packaged or handled should be kept at 10°C or lower
    • areas where food and ingredients that are not shelf stable (require refrigeration) are stored, should be kept at 4°C or lower
    • freezers should be kept at -18°C or lower
  • There is sufficient ventilation to remove airborne contaminants and prevent excessive heat, steam, condensation, vapours, smoke, particulates, dust, aerosols and odours:
    • ventilation is capable of providing sufficient air exchange to maintain a clean air supply
  • Ventilation in washrooms and waste storage areas is capable of removing excess moisture and odours
  • Ventilation does not permit air to flow from contaminated areas to clean areas - positive air pressure is maintained
  • Venting is not directed onto food, ingredients, processing aids, packaging materials, or food contact surfaces

Sewage and Liquid Waste Monitoring Procedure to ensure:

Note: Two waste streams exist in food facilities:

    • liquid waste or effluent, which generally consists of wash water, chill water, etc.
    • solid waste or sewage, which consists of human waste.
  • Sewage and liquid waste disposal systems are installed and maintained to prevent cross-contamination:
    • human waste is segregated from other waste
    • liquid waste and sewage lines do not pass directly over or through processing areas
    • waste lines are labelled/identified
    • liquid waste and sewage systems are equipped with traps and vents. (e.g. a "P" trap vented to the roof)
    • solid matter is separated from liquid waste by using a catch basin or grease trap, which is emptied at an appropriate frequency
  • The potable water supply has no cross-connections with the non-potable, sewage and liquid waste systems
  • Up-to-date blueprints that show all plumbing are available and used when monitoring your sewage and liquid waste system

Glass and Brittle Material Monitoring Procedure to ensure:

Note: Brittle material is any material that is hard or rigid that will readily break (e.g. hard plastic, ceramic), causing a potential physical hazard.

  • Unnecessary glass and brittle material is not present in the facility
  • Required glass and brittle material is used and stored only in designated areas:
    • as much as possible, eliminate glass and brittle materials and replace with shatterproof materials, or control them by protecting against breakage
    • replace light bulbs with shatterproof bulbs, or completely cover them to protect product in case the bulb breaks
    • replace windows in processing, handling or storage areas with shatterproof glass or protect against breakage
    • cover clocks with cages to protect against breakage - plastic clocks are preferred to glass
  • Permanent glass and brittle materials (e.g. windows, gauges, lights, clocks) are protected against breakage in processing, handling and storage areas:
    • identify all glass and brittle materials in the facility and their location (e.g. lights, gauges, packaging materials, laboratory glass, clock faces, windows, in-line pH meters, UV lights, sight glass covers)
  • All glass and brittle material is intact
  • Broken glass and brittle material incidents are fully controlled to protect food, ingredients, processing aids and packaging materials
    • determine the affected areas and products, considering the line speed, product flow, etc.
    • isolate and control the affected food, ingredients, processing aids or packaging materials (e.g. stop the line, cordon off the affected area)
    • consider what points in the process must be investigated (e.g. filters down the line that should be checked)
    • clean up using designated cleaning equipment
    • inspect to ensure cleanup was adequate and area is safe to be re-used

Exterior Monitoring Procedure to ensure:

  • Facility is located away from sources of external contaminants such as landfill sites, polluted areas and swamps:
    • if location cannot be changed, implement extra controls for your facility
  • Facility design and structure prevent entry of pests and contaminants
  • Facility surroundings prevent harbourage of pests
  • Facility property, roadways and parking lots are kept free of debris and litter
  • Driveways and parking areas are paved to minimize dust or mud
  • Vegetation (e.g. shrubs, grass) is minimized and kept well-trimmed
  • There is a perimeter of gravel or pavement around your facility
  • Drainage prevents pooling water or flooding
  • There are no unprotected openings (e.g. holes in walls/roof):
    • ventilation air intakes are equipped with close-fitting screens or filters
    • seal around pipe work
  • Exterior lights are located away from doors to prevent attracting insects/pests
  • Doors are tight-fitting and self-closing
  • Windows are sealed shut where they pose a risk to food safety

Facility Interior and Exterior Monitoring Records should include:

  • Who performed the monitoring
  • What was monitored
  • When the monitoring was performed
  • Monitoring results/findings
  • Any deviations
  • Corrective actions taken if deviations were found
  • Signed or initialed records when completed

Useful Resources


Building a Facility Interior and Exterior Training Procedure

Introduction

An effective facility interior and exterior training procedure ensures personnel understand the appropriate procedures to follow. To help you build training procedures for your facility, use this checklist in conjunction with the sample facility interior and exterior training procedure provided at the end of this section.

Your Facility Interior and Exterior Training Procedure should include:

  • Personnel who require training
  • Frequency of training (e.g. upon hiring, when change or incident occurs, minimum annually)
  • Person responsible to deliver training and keep records
  • A process to ensure all appropriate personnel are present for training
  • A list of training materials such as:
    • copies of Facility Interior and Exterior Monitoring Procedures
    • copies of Facility Interior and Exterior Monitoring Records
  • A method to assess that training was understood by participants (e.g. a written or verbal test and/or job shadowing)
  • Corrective actions to take if training assessment results are not acceptable

Your Facility Interior and Exterior Training Records should include:

  • Who was in attendance - with space for employees to initial or sign to indicate they received the training
  • Date of training
  • Topic of training
  • Material used in training
  • Name and signature of the trainer conducting the training
  • Results of training assessments

Useful Resources


Building a Facility Interior and Exterior Verification Procedure

Introduction

An effective facility interior and exterior verification procedure ensures personnel are following the appropriate procedures at your facility. Follow this checklist in conjunction with the sample interior and exterior verification procedure provided at the end of this section, to help you in building an effective facility interior and exterior verification procedure for your facility.

Your Facility Interior and Exterior Verification Procedure should include:

  • What is to be verified
  • Who performs the verification
  • When/how often they perform the verification
  • How they perform the verification (e.g. observation or interviews with personnel)
  • Corrective action procedures to be taken if verification results show that activities are not being conducted as written, or if any deviation is found
  • A process for verifying correctness and completeness of records including:
    • mistakes have been crossed through with a single line and initialled by the designated employee, and liquid paper has not been used
    • documents have been completed in permanent ink (no pencil)
    • all records are signed and dated by the designated employee
    • no blank spaces have been left on the record - if necessary "N/A" was recorded
    • the activities have been carried out in the appropriate frequency
    • there is no evidence of falsified entries
    • all deviations and corrective actions are documented and are suitable
    • if a deviation was recurring, a root cause analysis was conducted

Your Facility Interior and Exterior Verification Records should include:

Note: Verification records can be separate from monitoring records, or space can be allocated on the monitoring records to record the verification results.

  • Who performed the verification
  • What verification was performed (i.e. which procedure is being verified)
  • When the verification was performed
  • Verification results/findings
  • Any deviations
  • Corrective actions taken if deviations were found
  • Signed or initialed records when completed

Useful Resources


For more information:
Toll Free: 1-877-424-1300
E-mail: FoodSafety@ontario.ca


Author: OMAFRA Staff
Creation Date: 16 December 2013
Last Reviewed: 08 June 2018