Cleaning and Sanitation




Cleaning and Sanitation Checklist

Introduction

Having effective Sanitation and Pre-Operational Inspection procedures can minimize the risk of contamination to food, ingredients, processing aids, packaging materials, and food contact surfaces.

Use these checklists - in conjunction with the sample Sanitation and Pre-operational Inspection procedure documents provided at the end of this section - to help you in building effective procedures for your facility.

Your Sanitation procedure should include:

  • A list of all rooms, equipment and utensils - see sample
  • Cleaning and sanitizing instructions specific to each piece of equipment, utensil, and room in your facility:
    • include the following 7 steps for cleaning and sanitizing in each procedure:
  1. Remove gross debris
  2. Rough clean
  3. Pre-rinse
  4. Clean
  5. Post-rinse
  6. Inspect
  7. Sanitize (rinse sanitizer if necessary)

Note: You can develop a single procedure for a group of items if the cleaning methods and chemicals used are the same.

  • Instructions for disassembling and reassembling equipment, if required
  • Instructions to prevent cross-contamination (e.g. remove food/packaging materials from the area before cleaning)
  • Instructions for handling sanitation chemicals, including mixing instructions
  • Cleaning procedures for transportation vehicles, if you use your own
  • A sanitation schedule for items that are not cleaned daily

Your Pre-Operational Inspection Procedure should include:

  • Instructions for conducting pre-operational inspections to confirm that all rooms, equipment, and utensils are visibly clean:
    • inspections should be conducted prior to start-up and after any sanitation activities are performed during processing
    • equipment that has food contact surfaces that are not visible when assembled should be inspected before reassembly
  • Instructions for testing the effectiveness of cleaning and sanitizing (e.g. bioluminescence [ATP] or swab tests)

Note: Pre-operational inspections should not be conducted by the same person who performed the cleaning and sanitizing activities.

Your Cleaning and Sanitation Records should include:

  • Who performed the cleaning and sanitizing activities
  • What was cleaned and sanitized (e.g. which piece of equipment, which room)
  • When the cleaning and sanitizing was performed
  • Any deviations that occurred during cleaning and sanitizing
  • Corrective actions taken if deviations were found
  • Signed or initialed records when complete
  • Sanitation Records

Your Pre-operational Inspection Records should include:

  • Who performed the pre-operational inspection
  • What was inspected (e.g. which piece of equipment, which room)
  • When the inspection was performed
  • Any deviations found during the inspection
  • Corrective actions taken if deviations were found
  • Signed or initialed records when complete
  • Pre-Operational Inspection Record

Useful Resources


Building a Cleaning and Sanitation Training Procedure

Introduction

An effective cleaning and sanitation training procedure ensures personnel understand the appropriate procedures to follow. To help you build training procedures for your facility, use this checklist in conjunction with the sample sanitation training procedure documents provided at the end of this section.

Your Sanitation Training Procedure should include:

  • Personnel who require training
  • Frequency of training (e.g. upon hiring, when change or incident occurs, minimum annually)
  • Person responsible to deliver training and keep records
  • Process to ensure all appropriate personnel are present for training
  • A list of training materials such as:
    • copies of Sanitation Procedures and copies of Sanitation Records
    • GMP Training Kit - Module 3: Sanitation
    • hands-on demonstrations and practice e.g. In-plant demonstrations of the disassembly, cleaning and sanitation of equipment
    • videos and other visual aids
    • MSDS Sheets and instructions of usage for sanitation chemicals used at the facility
  • A method to assess that training was understood by participants (e.g. a written or verbal test and/or job shadowing)
  • Corrective actions to take if training assessment results are not acceptable

Your Sanitation Training Records should include:

  • Who was in attendance with space for employees to initial or sign to indicate they received the training
  • Date of training
  • Topic of training
  • Material used in training
  • Name and signature of the trainer conducting the training
  • Results of training assessments

Useful Resources


Building a Cleaning and Sanitation Verification Procedure

Introduction

An effective cleaning and sanitation verification procedure ensures personnel are following the appropriate procedures related to cleaning and sanitation. Follow this checklist in conjunction with the sample sanitation verification procedure document provided at the end of this section, to help you in building an effective cleaning and sanitation verification procedure for your facility.

Your Sanitation Verification Procedure should include:

  • Who performs the verification
  • When/how often they perform the verification
  • What is to be verified
  • How they perform the verification (e.g. observations or interviews with personnel)
  • Corrective action procedures to be taken if verification results show that activities are not being conducted as written, or if any deviation is found
  • A process for verifying correctness and completeness of records including:
    • mistakes have been crossed through with a single line and initialed by the designated employee, and liquid paper has not been used
    • documents have been completed in permanent ink (no pencil)
    • all records are signed and dated by the designated employee
    • no blank spaces have been left on the record - if necessary "N/A" was recorded
    • the activities have been carried out in the appropriate frequency
    • there is no evidence of falsified entries
    • all deviations and corrective actions are documented and are suitable
    • if a deviation was recurring, a root cause analysis was conducted

Your Sanitation Verification Records should include:

  • Who performed the verification
  • What verification was performed (i.e. which procedure is being verified)
  • When the verification was performed
  • Verification results/findings
  • Any deviations
  • Corrective actions taken if deviations were found
  • Records should be signed or initialed when completed

Note: Verification records can be separate from monitoring records, or space can be allocated on the monitoring records to record the verification results.

Useful Resources


For more information:
Toll Free: 1-877-424-1300
E-mail: FoodSafety@ontario.ca


Author: OMAFRA Staff
Creation Date: 16 December 2013
Last Reviewed: 08 June 2018