Wood-sorrel, Common yellow (Oxalis dillenii Jacq.)

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Table of Contents

  1. History
  2. Life Cycle
  3. Distinguishing Characteristics
  4. Control in Corn
  5. Control in Soybeans
  6. Control in Winter Wheat

History

Traditionally common yellow wood-sorrel has been prominent in lawns and gardens. However, No-till management practices have increased the presence of this weed in many of the field crops.

Life Cycle

A low growing perennial that reproduces mainly by seed.

Distinguishing Characteristics

Often confused with black medick, common yellow wood-sorrel is distinguished by its 3 heart shaped leaflets that are sour in taste (as a result of the oxalic acid) and are bright-green in colour. The flowers of common yellow are bright yellow and contain 5 pedals with 10-15 stamens. For more information, see Page 122 in OMAF Publication 505 - Ontario Weeds.

Common Yellow Wood-Sorrel Pictures

Each thumbnail image links to a larger image

Link to a larger photo of Common Yellow Wood-Sorrel

Link to a larger photo of Common Yellow Wood-Sorrel

Link to a larger photo of Common Yellow Wood-Sorrel


Herbicide Control in Field Corn

Pre-Emergent Control

One field experiment has shown that atrazine, Marksman and Converge all provide good control of common yellow wood-sorrel (Table 1).

Table 1. Wood-sorrel control in corn using various pre-emergent herbicides.
Active Ingredient Trade Name (application timing)
% Control
dicamba
BANVEL II (post)
99
isoxaflutole/atrazine
CONVERGE (pre)
99
dicamba/atrazine
MARKSMAN (pre or post)
99
atrazine
numerous products exists (pre)
99

Source: Dr. Peter Sikkema, Ridgetown College, University of Guelph.

Number of Trials: Table 1 based on a summary of 1 field trial in corn.

Herbicide Rates: Rates used in this trial are listed in OMAF Publication 75 - Guide to Weed Control.

Weed Stage: Pre-emergent treatments. Wood-sorrel had not yet emerged at the time of application.

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Herbicide Control in Soybeans

Pre-emergent applications are generally more effective than post-emergent applications. Full rates of Lorox, FirstRate and Broadstrike Dual Magnum provide adequate control of common yellow wood-sorrel (Table 1). Pursuit is ineffective when applied either pre or post-emergent.

Table 1. Wood-sorrel control in soybean using various pre-emergent herbicides.
Active Ingredient Trade Name (Rate)
% Control
cloransulam-methyl
FIRSTRATE (High Rate)
94
flumetsulam/s-metolachlor/benoxacor
BROADSTRIKE DUAL MAGNUM
83
linuron
LOROX L (High Rate)
81
metribuzin
SENCOR (High Rate)
65
s-metolachlor/benoxacor + metribuzin
BOUNDARY (High Rate)
65
imazethapyr + metribuzin
CONQUEST
63
imazethapyr
PURSUIT
61
Table 2. Wood-sorrel control in soybean using various post-emergent herbicides.
Active Ingredient Trade Name (Rate)
% Control
glyphosate
Numerous Products Exist (1 L/acre)
99
cloransulam-methyl
FIRSTRATE
83
imazethapyr
BPURSUIT
63
imazethapyr + bentazon
CLEANSWEEP
61
chlorimuron-ethyl
CLASSIC
55
fomesafen
REFLEX
35
thifensulfuron-methyl
PINNACLE
33
bentazon
BASAGRAN FORTE
30
acifluorfen
BLAZER
0

Source: Dr. Clarence Swanton, University of Guelph.

Number of Trials: Tables 1 and 2 are based on a summary of 1 field trial in no-till soybean.

Herbicide Rates: Rates used in this trial are listed in OMAF Publication 75 - Guide to Weed Control.

Weed Stage: For information in Table 1, common yellow wood-sorrel had not emerged yet. For information in Table 2, common yellow wood-sorrel was at the 3rd to 6th trifoliate stage.

What has been your experience?

We want your feedback. Let us know what you have experienced with these or other products, as well as any other effective management strategies.


Herbicide Control in Winter Wheat

No field studies have been conducted in Ontario. Wood-sorrel is generally not considered a prominent weed in Ontario cereal crops. The majority of herbicides used in winter wheat are applied post-emergent. Chemical control is generally most effective in situations where soil-applied residual herbicides can be used (Marshall, 1987). Therefore, effective control in soybean will minimize the potential for infestations in winter wheat.

A study conducted in Morocco found that clopyralid (LONTREL), bromoxynil (PARDNER or KORIL), tribenuron-methyl (1/2 of the active ingredient in REFINE EXTRA), MCPA, 2,4-D and dichlorprop/2,4-D (ESTAPROP or DICHLORPROP-D or TURBOPROP) did not provide effective control of buttercup oxalis (Tanji, 1994).

References:

Marshall, G. 1987. A review of the biology and control of selected species in the genus of Oxalis:O. stricta L., O. latifolia H.B.K. and O. pes-caprae L. Crop Protection. Vol. 6, No. 6. pp 355-364.

Tanji, A. 1994. The effects of herbicides on buttercup oxalis (Oxalis pes-caprae). Al Awamia. No.86. pp 83-100.

What has been your experience?

We want your feedback. Let us know what you have experienced with these or other products, as well as any other effective management strategies.


For more information:
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Email: ag.info@omaf.gov.on.ca