Noxious Weeds Profile - Wild Carrot

Table of Contents

Names

  • English - wild carrot (also known as Queen Anne's-Lace)
  • French - carotte sauvage
  • Latin - Daucas carota L.

Photos

Picture of wild carrot (also known as Queen Anne's-Lace) Picture of wild carrot (also known as Queen Anne's-Lace) Picture of wild carrot (also known as Queen Anne's-Lace)

Current Status

  • Ontario Weeds Act - noxious
  • Other provinces Weeds Act - Quebec
  • Canadian Federal Seeds Act - Class 3, Secondary noxious
  • U.S. Federal Noxious Weed - no
  • U.S. Noxious State Reg - 6 states (including Michigan, Minnesota, Ohio)

Poisonous/Cautions

  • Pub 505 - none indicated
  • NE Weeds - none indicated
  • Canadian Poison Plant - not listed
  • Cornell Poison Plant - not listed

Distribution

  • Occurs throughout southern Ontario in pastures, meadows, roadsides, waste areas. It is also common in fields using conservation tillage (no-till). Prefers well-drained to dry soils. Barbs on seeds aid in their dispersal. Wild carrot proliferates with intermittent soil disturbance.

Growth Habit

  • Biennial

Method of Propagation

  • Seeds

Control

  • Susceptible to dicamba, many biotypes tolerant to 2,4-D. Roundup controls this weed in no-till situations. Spray at rosette stage in fall or early spring Roundup controls this weed in no-till situations. Listed on Banvel label but not on Roundup or 2,4-D labels. Leaves are close to base of plant but cutting in mid summer cuts off seed umbels in the second year of growth. Annual cultivation destroys the first year plants and promotes germination to reduce the soil seed bank.

Other Comments

  • One of most common weeds with complaints under the Weed Control Act, especially in urban areas.

 


Related Links

 


For more information:
Toll Free: 1-877-424-1300
E-mail: ag.info.omafra@ontario.ca
Author: Mike Cowbrough - Chief Weed Inspector, Ontario Weed Control Act/OMAFRA
Creation Date:
July 2001
Last Reviewed: 28 December 2006