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Ministry of Agriculture, Food and Rural Affairs

Stink Bug

Stink bug damage on tomato fruit Stink Bug Damage, Possibly with Bacterial Disease Infection, on Tomato Fruit Green Stink Bug Nymph Green Stink Bug Nymph Green Stink Bug Nymph Green Stink Bug Adult Brown Stink Bug Egg Mass Brown Stink Bug Nymphs Brown Stink Bug Adult Brown Stink Bug Adult One Spotted Stink Bug Adult One Spotted Stink Bug Adult (Male)
Click to enlarge.

Beginner

Scientific Name
Euchistus servus (brown stink bug); Euchistus variolarius (one-spotted stink bug); Chinavia hilaris, formerly Acrosternum hilare (green stink bug)

Identification

  • Stink bugs feed on tomato fruit
  • Their piercing mouthparts sting the fruit, producing a yellowish blotch and corky tissue beneath the skin
  • Damaged fruit does not peel well during processing

Often Confused With
Tarnished plant bug

Spined Soldier Bug

Period of Activity
Adults are active at temperatures above 21°C (70°F).  The time for concern is from July through to harvest.  Stink bugs often move into tomatoes from wheat fields or weedy areas as they dry out in mid-summer.

Scouting Notes
Inspect the fruit for damage.  Search for the pest (adults and nymphs) in the lower parts of the plant and on the soil under the plant.  Shake foliage onto a tray or sheet.  Damage often occurs along field edges.

Thresholds
None established.

 

Megan Asche photograph, All Rights Reserved.

Graham Montgomery photographs, All Rights Reserved.

 

Advanced

Scientific Name
Euchistus servus (brown stink bug); Euchistus variolarius (one-spotted stink bug); Acrosternum hilare (green stink bug)

Identification
Stink bugs feed on tomato fruit.  The piercing-sucking mouthparts of the adults and nymphs cause cloudy yellow blotches just below the skin of the fruit.

Adults are brown or green and shield-shaped, about 1.3- 1.9 cm (½- 3/4 in.) long.  Nymphs are smaller, rounded, and wingless.  They may be a different colour than the adult.

Some stink bugs feed on insect pests.  You can distinguish the plant feeding (pest) stink bugs from the predatory (beneficial) stink bugs by the proboscis (beak).  Predatory stink bugs have a wide proboscis for attacking other insects, while plant-feeding stink bugs have a narrow, needle-like proboscis for probing plants.

Often Confused With
Tarnished plant bug

Spined Soldier Bug

Biology
Stink bugs overwinter as adults and have 1- 2 generations per year, depending on species.

Period of Activity
Adults are active at temperature above 21°C (70°F).  The time for concern is July through to harvest.  Stink bugs may move into tomato fields when surrounding vegetation dries up or after nearby cereal or forage harvest.

Scouting Notes
Inspect the fruit for damage.  Search for the pest (adult and nymphs) in the lower parts of the plant and on the soil under the plant.  Shake the foliage onto a tray or sheet.  Damage often occurs along field edges.

Thresholds
None established.

Management Notes

  • Stink bug damage is not a concern for processing tomatoes destined for paste.

Megan Asche photograph, All Rights Reserved.

Graham Montgomery photographs, All Rights Reserved.