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Ministry of Agriculture, Food and Rural Affairs

Brown marmorated stink bug

Brown Marmorated Stink Bug Brown Marmorated Stink Bug Brown Marmorated Stink Bug Brown Marmorated Stink Bug Egg Mass Brown Marmorated Stink Bug Nymphs- First Instar on Egg Mass Second Instar on Egg Mass Third Instar BMSB Nymph Fourth Instar BMSB Nymph Brown Marmorated Stink Bug Nymph Fifth Instar BMSB Nymph
Click to enlarge.

Beginner

Scientific Name
Halyomorpha halys

Identification
Eggs

  • Elliptical
  • White to light green
  • Deposited in masses of 20-30 on the underside of leaves

Nymphs

  • Oval, 5 instars, 2.4-12 mm in length and lacking wings
  • Early instars difficult to distinguish from many other species and have a tick-like appearance
  • First instars are bright red and remain on or near the egg mass
  • second instars are black
  • Older nymphs are pear-shaped, have a mottled rust coloured abdomen becoming brown with age, and have triangular markings on the edge of the abdomen and white bands on antennae similar to adults   

Adults

  • Shield-shaped, 12-17 mm long
  • Marbled brown-grey appearance
  • Smooth, rounded shoulders that do not protrude forward, with a single tooth-like projection right behind each eye
  • Edge of the abdomen has a geometric pattern of dark patches alternating with inward-pointing white triangles
  • Legs brown with faint white banding
  • White bands on last two  antennal segments

Damage

  • Both nymphs and adults can cause injury.
  • Not easily distinguishable from other stink bug injuries

Often Confused With
Other stink bugs (common brown stink bugs, one-spotted stink bugs)  western conifer seed bugs,  squash bugs and spined soldier bugs (beneficial stink bug species), each of which may share some but not all key distinguishing features with BMSB. All of these bugs have alternating patterns of dark and light patches along the edge of the abdomen, but lack white triangles and obvious banding on antennae

Period of activity
Emergence from overwintering sites and egg-laying are staggered, resulting in the presence of multiple life stages throughout most of the growing season.

Scouting Notes
Surveys for BMSB have not identified this pest in any crops in Ontario. However, there have been multiple finds around buildings and in non-crop areas since 2010 in many areas of southern Ontario

Threshold
There are no established thresholds for BMSB adults or nymphs.  Because a single feeding probe can create damage to fruit, even small numbers can cause considerable damage over the course of the growing season. 

 

Advanced

Scientific Name
Halyomorpha halys

Identification
Eggs

  • Elliptical
  • White to light green
  • Deposited in masses of 20-30 on the underside of leaves

Nymphs

  • Oval, 5 instars, 2.4-12 mm in length and lacking wings
  • Early instars difficult to distinguish from many other species and have a tick-like appearance
  • First instars are bright red and remain on or near the egg mass
  • second instars are black
  • Older nymphs are pear-shaped, have a mottled rust coloured abdomen becoming brown with age, and have triangular markings on the edge of the abdomen and white bands on antennae similar to adults   

Adults

  • Shield-shaped, 12-17 mm long
  • Marbled brown-grey appearance
  • Smooth, rounded shoulders that do not protrude forward, with a single tooth-like projection right behind each eye
  • Edge of the abdomen has a geometric pattern of dark patches alternating with inward-pointing white triangles
  • Legs brown with faint white banding
  • White bands on last two  antennal segments

Damage

  • Both nymphs and adults can cause injury.
  • Not easily distinguishable from other stink bug injuries

Often Confused With
Other stink bugs (common brown stink bugs, one-spotted stink bugs)  western conifer seed bugs,  squash bugs and spined soldier bugs (beneficial stink bug species), each of which may share some but not all key distinguishing features with BMSB. All of these bugs have alternating patterns of dark and light patches along the edge of the abdomen, but lack white triangles and obvious banding on antennae

Biology
Brown marmorated stink bug (BMSB) overwinters as an adult in protected areas, becoming active when temperatures increase in the spring.  In northern climates, there is a single generation per year.  The adults emerge in the spring and feed for several weeks on early season hosts before mating. Egg-laying occurs through the summer months, from May through August.  Both adults and nymphs can cause feeding damage to crops. . The adults are long-lived, with females laying eggs over an extended time period, resulting in seemingly overlapping generations with all life stages (eggs, nymphs and adults) present.  A single female may lay several hundred eggs.  Adults are highly mobile and migrate between host crops throughout the growing season. Adults move to overwintering sites (woodlots and rocky outcroppings, human built structures) in response to decreasing temperatures and daylength the fall.  Where populations are well-established, large numbers of overwintering BMSB adults can be found aggregating in structures. 

The BMSB is highly mobile and capable of moving between a very broad host range, including vegetable crops such as eggplant, peppers, tomatoes, sweet corn, and beans

Period of activity
Adults emerge in May through June as temperatures and day length increase. Females overwinter with undeveloped ovaries and must feed for 1-2 weeks prior to mating. Once mated, females lay numerous egg masses (~ 28 eggs each) until late July or early August. Emergence from overwintering sites and egg-laying are staggered, resulting in the presence of multiple life stages throughout most of the growing season. Decreasing day length in August and September triggers movement of new adults to overwintering sites.

Scouting Notes
Surveys for BMSB have not identified this pest in any crops in Ontario. However, there have been multiple finds around buildings and in non-crop areas since 2010 in many areas of southern Ontario

Threshold
There are no established thresholds for BMSB adults or nymphs. 


Management Notes 
Without careful examination for distinguishing characteristics by a qualified person, it is difficult to distinguish BMSB from other species. While OMAFRA extension staff, private consultants, and researchers are keeping an eye out for BMSB, growers and consultants who suspect they may have found BMSB should collect samples, freeze them in a container or in alcohol, and submit them to OMAFRA specialists for identification.

Visit the OMAFRA website or the Pest Management Regulatory Agency website to determine what insecticides are registered for BMSB in Ontario. If it is detected, consult OMAFRA specialists.

Some information included above excerpted from;

http://www.epa.gov/pesticides/controlling/stinkbugs/

http://njaes.rutgers.edu/stinkbug/identify.asp

http://ento.psu.edu/extension/factsheets/brown-marmorated-stink-bug